• Born in 1071 - Malcolm's Tower, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Deceased November 13, 1093 - Edwards Isle, Scotland,aged 22 years old
  • Buried - Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland

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  • Individual: FamilySearch sukupuu - Edward of Scotland<br>Även känd som: Edward mac Máel ColuimEdward mac Malcolm<br>Kön: Man<br>Födelse: 1071 - Malcolm's Tower, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland, United Kingdom<br>Vigsel: Make/Maka: mrs Canmore Aethelred - Fife Scotland<br>Död: 13 nov 1093 - Alnwick, Northumberland, England<br>Jordfästning: Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland<br>Föräldrar: Malcolm III King of Scotland, Margaret King of Scotland Queen of Scotland (född of Wessex)<br>Maka: mrs Canmore Aethelred<br>Syskon: Duncan II King of Scotland, Malcolm mac Malcolm, Earl of Ross, Donald mac Malcolm, Prince Edmund of Scotland, Ethelred mac Maíl Coluim, Edgar, King of Scotland, Alexander I, King of Scotland, Mary de Boulogne Countess of Boulogne (född of Scotland), Matilda Queen of England (född of Scotland), David I King of Scotland<br>  Ytterligare information: TitleOfNobility:Prince Of ScotlandTillhörighet:House of DunkeldLifeSketch:Edward of Scotland, also known as Edward mac Máel Coluim and Edward mac Malcolm, was the son of Malcolm III, King of Scots, and his second wife Margaret of Wessex. Believed to be born in 1071, in Dunfermline, Scotland, Edward was the oldest of their 8 children. Not much is known about Edward except for his death. Edward fought in the Battle of Alnwick alongside his father. Both he and his father died as a result of the battle. Some records report Edward dying in the battle, on 13 November, 1093, others that he was mortally wounded in the battle and died 3 days later on November 16, 1093. Legend has it that Edward's younger brother Edgar rode straight from the battle on November 13 to inform his mother of their deaths. When Margaret of Scotland learned of the death of both her husband and her son she died of a broken heart, Margaret died 3 days after her husband on November 16, 1093. There are no records of Edward ever marrying or having children --------------------------------------------- “Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial & Medieval Families,” Douglas Richardson (2013): “MALCOLM III (CEANNMORE), King of the Cumbrians, King of Scots, eldest son of Duncan I, King of Scots, by ___, cousin of Siward, Earl of Northumberland, born about 1031. He defeated and killed Macbeth, King of Scots at Lunfanan, Mar 15 August 1057. He became King of Scots on the defeat and death of Lulach 17 March 1057/8. He was crowned at Scone 25 April 1058. In 1061 he invaded England, and ravaged Northumberland and Lindisfarne. He married (1st) INGEBIORG (or INGIBJORG), widow of Earl Thorfin Sigurdson the Mighty, Earl of Orkney (died about 1064), and daughter of Earl Finn Arnason. They had three sons, Duncan [King of Scots], Malcolm, and Donald. His wife, Ingebiorg, died 17 Feb., year unknown. He married (2nd) at Dunfermline, Fife in 1068-9 [SAINT] MARGARET, daughter of Edward the Ætheling, by his wife, Agatha, kinswoman of Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor. They had six sons, Edward, Edmund [Prince of Cumbria, afterwards a monk], Ethelred [Earl of Fife, Abbot of Dunkeld], Edgar [King of Scots], Alexander [I] [King of Scots], and David [I] [King of Scots], and two daughters, Maud and Mary. He invaded England in the spring of 1069/70, and ravaged Teesdale, Cleveland, Holderness, and the country between the Tees and the Tyne. In 1072 King William the Conqueror invaded Scotland by land and sea, and King Malcolm gave hostages and became 'his man' about 15 August 1072. In 1072 he granted lands in Lothian to his kinsman, Gospatric, who was deprived of the earldom of Northumberland by King William the Conqueror. He and his wife, Margaret, granted Ballichristian to the Culdees of Lochleven. He expelled Malsnectai, mormaer of Moray in 1078. In 1079 he devasted Northumberland as far as the Tyne. He harried a great part of the north of England in 1091; he and King William II of England made peace in Sept. 1091. He was present at the laying of the foundation stone at Durham Cathedral 11 August 1093. In August 1093 he went to Gloucester, where King William II refused to receive him. At the beginning of November 1093 he invaded England again. MALCOLM III, King of Scots, was killed by Morel of Bamborough at Alnwick, Northumberland 13 Nov. 1093. He was initially buried at Tynemouth, but his son, King Alexander I, later removed his body to Dunfermline, Fife. His widow, Margaret, died at Edinburgh Castle 16 Nov. 1093, and was buried before the high altar in the church of the Holy Trinity at Dunfermline, Fife. She was canonized by Pope Innocent IV in 1250. Dalrymple Annals of Scotland 1 (1797): 1-50. Rod Codicum Manuscriptorum Ecclesiae Cathedralis Dunelmensis (1825): 215 (Monachi & alii Quorum in Margine Matyrologii: "XIII. Kal. Mar. [17 Feb.]. Ob. Ingeberga Comitissa"), 218 ("Id. Nov. [13 Nov.]. Ob. Malcolmus et Dunecanus Reges Scottorum et Margarita Regina"). Burton Hist. of Scotland 1 (1867): 350 ("Malcolm the son of Duncan is known as Malcolm III., but still better perhaps by his characteristic name of Canmore, said to come from the Celtic 'Cenn Mór,’ meaning 'great head."). Turgot Life of St Margaret, Queen of Scotland (1884). Scots Peerage 1 (1904): 1-2 (sub Kings of Scotland). Lawrie Early Scottish Charters prior to A.D. 1153 (1905): 7 (Notitia of a grant by King Malcolm III and Queen Margaret to the Keledei of Loch Leven dated 1070-93), 7-8 (letter from Lanfranc, Archbishop of Canterbury to Margaret, Queen of Scotland dated 1070-89), 8-9 (charter of King Malcolm III to the Church of Dunfermline dated 1070-93), 271 ("The older writers call Duncan `nothus,’ a bastard, but when Torfæus relying on the Orkneyinga Saga, stated that Malcolm Canmore had married Ingibiorg, the widow of Earl Thorfin, and had by her a son, Duncan, later Scottish historians began to consider Duncan to be legitimate."). Dunbar Scottish Kings (1906): 25-34. Anderson Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers (1908). Anderson Early Sources of Scottish Hist. 1 (1922.) Ritchie Normans in Scotland (1954). Duquesne Review 7 (1962): 71-80. Palsson & Edwards Orkneyinga Saga: The History of the Earls of Orkney (1978). Anderson Kings & Kingship in Early Scotland (1980). Barrow Kingship & Unity: Scotland, 1000-1306 (1989). Fryde & Greenway Handbook of British Chronology (1996): 57. NEHGR 152 (1998): 224-235. Broun Irish Identity of the Kingdom of the Scots (1999). Barrell Medieval Scotland (2000). Duncan Kingship of the Scots 842-1292 (2002). Barrow Kingdom of the Scots (2003). Tanner Fams., Friends, & Allies (2004): 313 (Scotland ped.). Dunlop Queen Margaret of Scotland (2005). Children of King Malcolm III, by Ingebiorg of Orkney: i. DUNCAN II, King of Scots, married ETHELREDA (or OCTREDA) OF DUNBAR [see HARINGTON 2]. ii. MALCOLM OF SCOTLAND. He witnessed a charter of his brother, king Duncan II, in 1094. His subsequent history is unknown. Dunbar Scottish Kings (1906): 25-34. iii. DONALD OF SCOTLAND, died in 1085. Scots Peerage 1 (1904): 1-2 (sub Kings of Scotland). Dunbar Scottish Kings (1906): 25-34. Duncan Scotland: The Making of the Kingdom (1975): 118. Magnusson Scotland: The Story of a Nation (2003): 62. Children of King Malcolm III, by [Saint] Margaret: i. EDWARD OF SCOTLAND. He was wounded at Alnwick, Northumberland 13 Nov. 1093, and died at Edwardsisle near Jedburgh 16 Nov. 1093. He was buried in Dunfermline, Fife. Scots Peerage 1 (1904): 1-2 (sub Kings of Scotland). Dunbar Scottish Kings (1906): 25-34. Fryde & Greenway Handbook of British Chronology (1996): 57. Broun Irish Identity of the Kingdom of the Scots (1999): 196. Tanner Fams., Friends, & Allies (2004): 313 (Scotland ped.). ii. EDMUND OF SCOTLAND. He joined his uncle, Donald Bane, against his half-brother, King Duncan II, and seems to have ruled the parts of Scotia south of the Firths of Forth and Clyde, from 12 Nov. 1094 to October 1097. He subsequently became a monk and died at Montague, Somerset. Scots Peerage 1 (1904): 1-2 (sub Kings of Scotland). Dunbar Scottish Kings (1906): 25-34. Fryde & Greenway Handbook of British Chronology (1996): 57. Tanner Fams., Friends, & Allies (2004): 313 (Scotland ped.). iii. ETHELRED, Abbot of Dunkeld. He gave lands to the Culdees of Lochleven. At his death, he was buried in the church at Kilrimont. Scots Peerage 1 (1904): 1-2 (sub Kings of Scotland). Dunbar Scottish Kings (1906): 25-34. Fryde & Greenway Handbook of British Chronology (1996): 57. Tanner Fams., Friends, & Allies (2004): 313 (Scotland ped.). iv. EDGAR, King of Scots, born about 1074. He witnessed a charter of his half-brother, King Duncan II, in 1094. He became King of Scots after his uncle, King Donald Bane, had been deposed, with the help of the English under Egdar Atheling (his mother's brother) about 8 October 1097. He gave lands to the church at Durham, Coldingham, Dunfermline, and St. Andrews. He took his uncle, Donald Bane, ex-King of Scots, prisoner in 1099. He died unmarried at Edinburgh Castle 8 Jan. 1106/7, and was buried before the great altar in the church at Dunfermline, Fife. Rud Codicam Manuscriptomm Ecclesiae Cathedralis Dunelmensis (1825): 215 (Monachi & alii Quorum in Margine Matyrologii: "III. Id. Jan. [11 Jan.]. Ob. Ædgarus Rex Scottorum"). Scots Peerage 1 (1904): 3 (sub Kings of Scotland). Dunbar Scottish Kings (1906): 25-34, 45-49. Fryde & Greenway Handbook of British Chronology (1996): 57. Broun Irish Identity of the Kingdom of the Scots (1999): 196. Duncan Kingship of the Scots 842-1292 (2002). Barrow Kingdom of the Scots (2003). Oram David I: The King Who Made Scotland (2004). Tanner Fams., Friends, & Allies (2004): 313 (Scotland ped.). (Continues with more children...)

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